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How To Become A Frontend Developer in 2021

Zomer Gregorio Photo

Zomer Gregorio | Modified: September 19, 2021

Have you ever looked at your favorite website and wondered why it looked like that, how the buttons worked, or thought, “I wonder how complicated that is?” or, “I wish I could do that“? While web design determines the way a website looks, front end development is how that design actually gets implemented on the web.

Everything you see on a website is built with front end development (sometimes also called “front end web development”) — and the people behind it have a name: front end developers.

A front end web developer is a software engineer who implements web designs through coding languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. If you head to any site, you can see the work of a front end developer in the navigation, layouts (including this article), and in the way that a site looks different on your phone (thanks to mobile-first or responsive design).

So, how do you become a front end developer in 2021?

The first step is to start learning some of the fundamental skills that front end developers use on a day-to-day basis. Let’s take a look at what you need to learn.

TABLE OF CONTENTS: SKILLS YOU NEED TO BECOME A FRONT END DEVELOPER

  • HTML/CSS
  • JavaScript
  • JavaScript Frameworks
  • Front End Frameworks
  • CSS Preprocessors
  • RESTful Services/API
  • Responsive/Mobile Design
  • Cross-Browser Development
  • Content Management Systems (CMS)
  • Testing/Debugging
  • Git/Version Control
  • Problem Solving

HTML & CSS

HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) are the most basic building blocks of web coding. Without these two skills, you can’t create a website design — all you’d have is unformatted plain text on the screen. In fact, you can’t even add images to a page without HTML!

Before you get started on any web development career path, you’ll have to master coding with HTML and CSS. The good news is that getting a solid working knowledge of either of these can be done in just a few.

JavaScript

JavaScript lets you add a ton more functionality to your websites, and you can create a lot of basic web applications using nothing more than HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (JS for short).

At the most basic level, JS is used to create and control things like maps that update in real time, interactive films, and online games. Sites like Pinterest use a lot of JavaScript to make their user interface easy to use (the fact that the page doesn’t reload whenever you pin something is thanks to JavaScript!).

It’s also the most popular programming language in the world, so regardless of your developer career plans, it’s a super valuable thing to learn.

JavaScript Frameworks

JS frameworks (including Angular, Backbone, Ember, Vue.js, and React) give a ready-made structure to your JavaScript code. There are different types of JavaScript frameworks for different needs, though the five mentioned are the most popular in actual job listings (especially React).

In fact, knowing React can net you up to over ₱100,000. While learning JavaScript frameworks does take time, they really speed up development by giving you a jumpstart.

Front End Frameworks

CSS and front end frameworks (including Bootstrap, Tailwind CSS, and Material-UI) do for CSS what JS Frameworks do for JavaScript: they give you a jumping-off point for faster coding. Since so much CSS starts with exactly the same elements from project to project, a framework that defines all of these for you upfront is super valuable. Most front end developer job listings expect you to be familiar with how these frameworks work and how to use them, so you should definitely get a head start if you want to be a front end programmer or just to further hone your front end development skills.

Experience with CSS Preprocessors

Preprocessors are another element that a front end developer can use to speed up CSS coding. A CSS preprocessor adds extra functionality to CSS to keep our CSS scalable and easier to work with. It processes your code before you publish it to your website, and turns it into well-formatted and cross-browser friendly CSS. Sass and LESS are the two most in-demand preprocessors.

Experience with RESTful Services and APIs

Without getting too technical on this one, REST stands for Representational State Transfer. In basic terms, it’s a lightweight architecture that simplifies network communication on the web, and RESTful services and APIs are web services that adhere to REST architecture.

Let’s say you wanted to write an app that shows you all of your social media friends in the order in which you became friends. You could make calls to Facebook’s RESTful API to read your friends list and return that data. As a front end web developer, you could call Twitter’s API as well (Twitter also uses RESTful APIs). The general process is the same for any service that uses RESTful APIs, only the data returned will be different.

While it all sounds really complicated and technical, it’s a simple set of guidelines and practices that sets expectations so you know how to communicate with a web service. It also makes a web service perform better, scale better, work more reliably, and be easier to modify or move.

Responsive and Mobile Design

Google drives 96% of mobile search traffic and recommends responsive design as a best practice. Because responsive web design is mobile-friendly, it helps increase visibility on search engines, which in turn can mean more visitors to your website. So it’s no wonder that responsive and mobile design skills are super important to employers. Responsive design means that the site’s layout (and sometimes functionality and content) change based on the screen size and device someone is using.

For example, when you visit a website from a desktop computer with a big monitor, you’ll see multiple columns, big graphics, and interaction created specifically for mouse and keyboard users. On a mobile device, the same website would appear as a single column optimized for touch interaction, but using the same base files.

Mobile design can include responsive design, but can also mean creating separate mobile-specific designs. Sometimes the experience you want a user to have when visiting your site on a desktop computer is entirely different from what you want them to see when visiting from their smartphone.

In those cases, it makes sense for the mobile site to be completely different. A bank website with online banking would benefit from a separate mobile site that lets users view things like the closest bank location and a simplified account view (since mobile screens are smaller).

Cross-Browser Development

Modern browsers are getting pretty good at displaying websites consistently, but there are still differences in how they interpret code behind the scenes. Until all modern browsers work perfectly with web standards, knowing how to make each of them work the way you want them to is an important skill. That’s what cross-browser development is all about.

Content Management Systems and E-commerce Platforms

Almost every website out there is built on a content management system (CMS). (E-commerce platforms are a specific type of CMS.) The most popular CMS worldwide is WordPress, which is behind-the-scenes of millions of websites. In fact, almost 60% of websites that use a CMS use WordPress.

Other popular CMSs include Joomla, Drupal, and Magento. While knowing these won’t put you in as much demand as being a WordPress expert, they can give you a niche that will be desirable among companies who use those systems (and there are plenty out there).

As an aspiring front end developer, CMS skills could potentially give you an edge when it comes to landing a job.

Testing and Debugging

It’s a fact of life for a front end web developer: bugs happen. Being familiar with testing and debugging processes is vital.

Unit testing is the process of testing individual blocks of source code (the instructions that tell a website how it should work), and unit testing frameworks provide a specific method and structure for doing so (there are different ones for each programming language).

Another common type of testing is UI testing (also called acceptance testing, browser testing, or functional testing), where you check to make sure that the website behaves as it should when a user is actually using the site.

You can write tests that will look for things like particular HTML on a page after an action is taken — like making sure that if a user forgets to fill out a required form field, your form error box pops up.

Debugging is simply taking all of the “bugs” (errors) those tests uncover (or your users uncover once your site is launched), putting on your detective hat to figure out why and how they’re happening, and fixing the problem. Different companies use slightly different processes for this, but if you’ve used one, you can adapt to others pretty easily.

Because testing and bugging contribute in large part to a positive user experience, they’re valuable skills for a front end developer to know.

Git and Version Control Systems

Version control systems let you keep track of changes that have been made to code over time. They also make it easy to revert back to an earlier version if you screw something up.

Let’s say you write some codes and suddenly half of your other code breaks. Rather than having to scramble to manually undo it and fix all of the errors, you can roll back to a previous version and then try it again with a different solution — like hitting a reset button.

Git is the most widely used of these version control management systems and can be installed using the command line. Knowing how to use Git is going to be a requirement for virtually any development job, be it front end development, back end development, or full stack development. This is one of those vital job skills that developers need to have but few actually talk about.

Problem Solving Skills

If there’s one thing that all front end developers have to have, regardless of the job description or official title, it’s excellent problem solving skills. From figuring out how to best implement a design, to fixing bugs that crop up, to figuring out how to make your front end code work with the back end code another software engineer has written, development is all about creative problem solving.

For example: you’ve created a perfectly-functioning website front end and you hand it over to the back end developers for them to integrate it with the content management system (CMS). All of a sudden, half your awesome features stop working.

A good front end developer will view this as a puzzle to be solved rather than an absolute disaster. Of course, an excellent, senior-level front end developer will anticipate these problems and try to prevent them in the first place!